Terminology Course: February 6, 2014

carte conceptuelle

Are concept maps useful? This is the sort of question that was in my mind before each student briefly presented their concept maps.

The theme was the New Economy. And it turns out that concept maps are not only useful but are a reflection of individual creativity and freedom of thought, things that are necessary for terminology projects.

I showed my own concept map on a previous post, but mine is only one approach out of many.

Each concept map on the New Economy had different perspectives, approaches, and ideas, which in turn inspires new angles to look at a specific subject or concept.

To me, the main lesson of this project is to show that there are many possibilities when channeling and organizing an idea or a concept, and that each of those possibilities is worth exploring.

Le Monde

downton abbey

 

 

 

 

 

 

radio canada

Other issues were discussed in class: the difference between international vocabulary and Canadian vocabulary and how globalization affects vocabulary.

Complicated issues indeed.

There is certainly a difference in vocabulary that is easy to notice by just reading a few online newspapers from Canada and from the United Kingdom. And, precisely, the Internet makes it easy for people to familiarize with lexical differences or even phonetic differences.

I can easily watch on the Internet a television series from England, say Downton Abbey, or read a Parisian newspaper like Le Monde, while being aware of the linguistic differences from Canadian television or newspapers. Could I possibly mix them both? Perhaps, but I like to think that thanks to technology I’m able to enrich my vocabulary or adjust my ear to different pronunciations.

As a terminology student, being curious and all about learning new things, I cannot but be grateful to these modern technological advantages.

Concept Map Image: Rémi Bachelet “Évaluer une carte conceptuelle”, 2013. Flickr, Creative Commons License, 2014.

Other images: Flickr, Creative Commons License, 2014.

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